Category Archives: folklore

The Lore of Litha

Merry Meet All,

Today we are going to look at the folklore of Litha.

At Midsummer, the rural villagers lit bonfires on Midsummer’s Eve to ward off evil spirits. They also leapt over the flames to encourage good luck.

If you performed your ritual outdoors, you can use the ashes to make a protective amulet. This works best if you burned incense with the intention to create protection. The intent will linger in the smouldering ashes. Put the ashes in a glass jar, a small pouch, or knead them into clay to make a protective talisman. Its believed that ashes will protect you from misfortune. You can scatter the ashes onto your garden and your garden will absorb the ashes and protective energies.

It is believed in some parts of England that if you sit in a circle all night long, you may see the Fae. Carry rue on your person to protect you while seeing the faeries or turn your jacket inside out. Leave a faerie plate out and remember to reward the garden spirits for protecting your garden for you. Midsummer is the perfect time for faery magick.

Carry a stone in your hand as you circle the bonfires during your ritual. Whisper your request to the stone. After your third turn- by the power of three times three!- toss the stone into the flames.

At Midsummer, the sun enters Cancer, which is a water sign. Circle the body of water three times, walking deosil, and offer silver coins or pins. Sunwheels are popular at Midsummer. A wheel or bale of straw was lit on fire and rolled down a hill. The remaining burned remnants were taken to a temple and put on display.

Blessed Be,
Lady Spiderwitch )O(

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Beltaine Lore

Merry Meet All,

Beltaine is tomorrow. April gives way to a fertile earth. The songbirds fill the air with their songs and grass turns green. Beltaine is here!

The deities of Beltaine are: Pan (Greek). This agricultural god watched over shepherds and their flocks. He roamed the woods and pastures and played tunes on his flute. He appears like a faun, and is often honoured as a fertility god.

Flora (Roman): The goddess of spring and flowers was celebrated annually from April 28 to May 3rd. The Romans wore bright robes and floral wreaths, and attended festivals in her honour. They offered milk and honey to the Goddess.

Let’s not forget the Fae. Leave an offering in your garden to welcome them back to guard and nurture your garden to grow. Hang a garland of green over your door for protection. Collect some morning dew on the morning of Beltaine. Use the dew to clean your face, and in ritual as consecrated water, to invoke the goddesses Diana and Artemis. Bake oatcakes to ensure you will have abundance of your crops for the year.

Merry Beltaine

Blessed Be,
Lady Spiderwitch )O(

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Filed under Beltaine, celebrations, folklore, rituals