Mabon Correspondences

Merry meet all,

We are now in Mabon. I attended a public Mabon Ritual this weekend. I really enjoyed it. 

Mabon is about balance and the autumnal equinox. The symbols of Mabon are: corn, autumn flowers, red poppies, nuts, grains, leaves, acorns, pine and cypress cones, oak sprigs, wreaths, vine, grapes, cornucopia, horns of plenty, burial cairns, apples, marigolds, harvested crops. wine, gourds

The colors of Mabon are: orange, Dark Red, Yellow, Indigo, Maroon and Brown

The Deities of Mabon

Goddesses: Modron(Welsh), Bona Dea, Harvest Dieties, Persephone, Demeter/Ceres, Morgan(Welsh- Cornish), Snake Woman(Aboriginal), Epona (Celtic-Gaulish), Pamona(Roman), the Muses(Greek)

Gods: Mabon, Modron(Welsh), Sky Father, John Barleycorn , the Wicker-Man, the Corn Man, Thoth(Egyptian), Hermes, Hotei(Japanese), Thor, Dionysus(Roman), Bacchus(Greek) and all wine Deities

Altar Decorations: acorns, pinecones, autumn leaves, pomegranate, statue of the Triple Goddess in her Mother phase.
Mabon Herbs: Rue, yarrow, rosemary, marigold, sage, walnut leaves and husks, mistletoe, saffron, chamomile, almond leaves, passionflower, frankincense, rose hips, bittersweet, sunflower, wheat, oak leaves, dried apple or apple seeds.
Foods of Mabon: cornbread, wheat products, bread, grains, berries, nuts, grapes, acorns, seeds, dried fruits, corn, beans, squash, roots (ie onions, carrots, potatoes, etc), hops, apples, pomegranates, carrots, onions, potatoes, roast goose or mutton, wine, ale and ciders, breads, apples, pomegranates
Animals: dogs, wolves, stag, blackbird, owl, eagle, birds of prey, salmon & goat, Gnomes, Sphinx, Minotaur, Cyclops, Andamans and Gulons.

Element: water.

Incense : pine, sweetgrass, apple blossom, benzoin, myrrh, frankincense, jasmine, sage wood aloes, black pepper, patchouly, cinnamon, clove, oak moss

Mabon Stones : During Mabon, stones ruled by the Sun will help bring the Sun’s energy to you.clear quartz, amber, peridot, diamond, gold, citrine, yellow topaz, cat’s-eye, adventurine.

Customs: offerings to land, preparing for cold weather by bringing in harvest, cutting willow wands( Druidic), leaving apples upon burial cairns & graves as a token of honor, walks in forests, gather seed pods & dried plants, fermenting grapes to make wine, picking ripe produce, stalk bundling

Spellworkings of Mabon: Protection, prosperity, security, and self- confidence. Also those of harmony and balance. Taboos:It was considered unlucky to cut down the very last of the Harvest, and so was also left to stand in the field by some traditions.

Activities of Mabon: Select the best of each vegetable, herb, fruit, nut, and other food you have harvested or purchased and give it back to Mother Earth with prayers of thanksgiving. Hang dried ears of corn around your home in appreciation of the harvest season. Do meditations and chanting as you store away food for the Winter. Do a thanksgiving circle, offering thanks as you face each direction – – for home, finances, and physical health (North); for gifts of knowledge (East); for accomplishments in career and hobbies (South); for relationships (West); and for spiritual insights and messages (Center). Decorate the table with colorful autumn leaves in a basket. Display the fruits of the harvest – corn, gourds, nuts, grapes, apples – preferably in a cornucopia. Or decorate with wildflowers, acorns, nuts, berries, cocoons, anything that represents the harvest to you. Like its sister equinox, halfway across the Wheel of the Year, the Autumn Equinox is a good occasion for a ritual feast. Plan a meal that uses seasonal and symbolic fruits and vegetables. You can serve bread, squash, corn, apples, cider and wine. Make some homemade wine or cordial gather and dry herbs, plants, seeds and seed pods. Make grapevine wreaths using dried bitter-sweet herb for protection. Use ribbons of gold and yellow to bring in the energy of the Sun, and decorate with sprigs of dried yarrowor cinnamon sticks. Make a protection charm of hazelnuts (filberts) strung on red thread. Make a witch’s broom. Tie dried corn husks or herbs (broom, cedar, fennel, lavender, peppermint, rosemary) around a strong, relatively straight branch of your choice. Make magic Apple Dolls Gifts of the Harvest can be used to make tools and emblems that will remind us of their bounty all year round. Look for colored leaves. Collect fallen leaves and make a centerpiece or bouquet for your home. Save the leaves to burn in your Yule fire. Vist an apple orchard and, if possible, pick your own apples. Hang apples on a tree near your home. Watch the birds and other small animals who will enjoy your gift. This is also the time for replacing your old broom with a new one. As the broom corn is ripe now, besom making is traditional and magickal this time of year. Begin the festival with a vineyard or orchard harvest. You might check the farm lands in your area to see if there’s an orchard or pumpkin patch that allows customers to harvest produce for themselves. Traditionally Sabbat festivals begin at sun set on the eve of the Holiday. You can use the daytime hours of this holiday eve to prepare baskets for harvesting the next day. Baking a pumpkin pie (from scratch if possible) is a wonderful way to bring in the fragrance of the holiday season

Credit to: https://witchesofthecraft.com/2012/09/06/mabon-activities-and-correspondences/ for article info. 

Blessings, Spiderwitch

 

Harvest Plant Protection

Merry meet all,

The full moon passed recently. The moon was beautiful! The frost has come this week-it’s early! I have to cover my plants tonight. The tender plants need to be protected. 

Mabon is almost here! I can sure feel autumn in the air. It’s that time of year again. I harvested a good sized green tomato and a tiny cucumber today. The tomato refused to ripen on the vine. It took its own sweet time. So since there was a frost and I was so impatient, in they came. See photo below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To protect your plants from the frost, you can use glass cloches, buckets or old sheets. You may still have some tender annuals that are producing veggies such as tomatoes. See the cucumber in the image above? Btw, garden grown veggies are tastier than the ones you buy in the store. Don’t believe me. Grow your own then comment below. Remove the coverings in the morning. The plants need to breathe but be covered at night. Watering the garden during the late afternoon is a good idea. I just stepped out to protect my plants and it was so cold out! Wow. Good thing for tea. 

Hardy plants will be fine. The temperatures warm up during the day time. Don’t smother the plants! Keep an eye on the temperatures on the websites. Trust your instincts. Stock up on soil and pots if you want to bring plants in for the winter. I plan to bring in the catnip for Penny, the lemon grass, the ginger, the geranium and my herbs such as basil, parsley and maybe a few other ones. I do plan to plant garlic this fall but in a different spot than before for bigger garlic heads. 

I hope this all helps you eager gardeners to protect your plants from the frost. I am sad because I want to help my plants grow as wonderfully as they can. At the same time, I know that time of year is here! But I will keep draping old sheets over my garden at night and letting them get sun all day. If you do the same for yours, you can still have a good harvest! Your plants worked hard for you. They deserve care too. 

BB Spiderwitch

Autumn Harvest Time

Merry meet all,

Mabon is almost here! I survived the hurricane Dorian. It was super crazy here. My garden survived the hurricane. I harvested the shallots, a cucumber, a tiny cherry tomato and several purple beans. I froze the beans, am drying the shallots and stored the cucumber in the fridge. Last night when I had power back in my apartment, I conjured a pot of health boosting vegetable soup. 

When I had power in my apartment again, I made a pot of coffee and pancakes fast. It is amazing how weird everything is when there is no electricity. Nearly 500,000 people were without power. Now that the storm has passed, it is time for recovery. 

The stores are carrying Halloween stuff now. It is the most magical time of year. I love Mabon. I personally like to think of the whole month of September as being October 30th leading to October 31st. Now is the time to think about the harvest- metaphorically and literally. I have harvested herbs, veggies and flowers from my garden. I shall also reflect on what I am harvesting over the year since the last Samhain. 

Soon the stores will be carrying pumpkins! The Full Moon this weekend is also a Harvest Moon! That is a good time also to reflect on what you achieved or gained over the year. I plan to do a full moon esbat. I usually perform them solitary but I am not really alone. Spirit is with me. So take the time to reflect on your year. 

On to a new topic:

I have a friend who truly is being harassed by a nasty spirit, or what some may call a demon. I believe him and I always know when a story  or cry for help is genuine. A good sign is that the one who is being haunted if he/ she is fake, then they are boasting. He is not boasting, he is suffering. That is a huge difference. I am able to actually see spirits so I may have a different perspective here. I wish I could help him in person but he lives far away from me. I could really help him if I lived where he lives. I am sure I could and I wouldn’t be as affected by the demon because I know how to shield and deflect such bad energy. He wants to attempt an exorcism. I wish I could teach him how to shield himself. Once you cast off that bad energy, then you can’t be affected or overpowered again and the spirits hate that. 

They want you to be weak. They want you to suffer. They feed off of that. 

Yes I am a Ghost Adventures fan. I read Zac Bagans’ book, I am Haunted. In the book, he describes how he takes a long time to get rid of parasitic ghost pests. Sounds like he doesn’t know how to shield himself either. I feel now like I am privy to elite secret information, knowing how to shield myself. Maybe this will show you all just how important it is. 

Samhain is not far off. Not only is this a good time to harvest what we reaped, but also a good time to prepare ourselves for a spooky season. !!

 

Blessings, Spiderwitch

Cemetery sentiments

Merry meet all,

Recently I visited an arts store because they carried Halloween stuff. I strolled through the aisles, and made mental notes on what to buy once I finally had some money. Seeing the Halloween stuff ( statues, skeletal arms, witch dolls, upside down bats, brooms) cheered me a little. Samhain is my favorite time of year.

The air is cooler today. It is still August but the leaves were falling already in the cemetery. I was also recently in a cemetery trying to write poetry. I did get one poem done though it is far from word perfect. I like the cemetery I visited. I saw a moth flitting over the ground, birds pecking for seeds, crows screeching from the treetops.

The engravings on the tombstones were too faint to read. I sat on the stone step, my notebook and a pen in hand, and just sat for a while soaking in the atmosphere. Inspiration seized me. I now want to write a small chapbook of poetry. It will be effort but everything is effort. There were tombstones of varying sizes and shapes. Everyone probably considered me weird seated and doing what I was doing, but I don’t care.

There is no safer place to be. The quiet of a cemetery lets me think. They are not such dangerous places but people should still use common sense. I just like dark verse.

One problem or side effect of being clairsentient and writing poetry in cemeteries is taking spirits home with you. Parasitic astral larvae live in cemeteries and often want to come home with me. While they get my empathy, I am just not sure I want to suddenly see dishes fly off shelves or my bed rattle late at night. I leave the energies there when I exit a cemetery. I do feel for them- I am sure being dead is no fun, but I have to establish and maintain boundaries.

Ah fall.. time for cardigans, cider, root vegetable meals, and pumpkins. Onions, parsnips, turnips, potatoes are all excellent healthy veggies. The skins are often the most nutrient rich part of the root vegetable. So go ahead, as you peruse some dark gothic poetry, enjoy soups and stews. If you grew the veggies yourself and cook them yourself, you enjoy twice the amount of nutrients because you know where they came from. I advocate for organic food. I know I will be. I grew my own garlic, dill, basil, mint, lavender, chives, and even shallots this year. I can’t wait to harvest more. I did harvest my garlic and dill and froze the dill, The garlic is braided and hanging up in my kitchen. I am waiting till the perfect harvest time to gather in the rest. The health and quality of growing your own veggies and herbs is unsurpassed- and not tainted by those horrid chemicals from the supermarket.

Enjoy fall!

Blessings Spiderwitch

The Natural Psychic by Ellen Dugan

Merry meet all,

Mabon is almost here! It feels like fall already. My fave time of year is almost here! My garden is so beautiful even in the rain. Samhain follows after Mabon. Soon pumpkins will decorate everyone’s porches. 

I want to recommend a few good books about psychic development that I enjoy. The first one, The Natural Psychic, by Ellen Dugan, is a great book. She does away with the usual morbid or tell you how to do this or that. Instead, she fills the book up with a down to earth tone and is such an engaging writer. You feel like you are seated across from her at a noisy café. I loved this book and couldn’t put it down. The front cover shows flowers and a bright yellow cover. 

The Natural Psychic is a great introduction book about psychic development. I highly recommend it to anyone just starting out. She includes diagrams, quotations and goes in depth on a lot of material. She covers what psychic ability is, the different types of psychic ability from clairaudience to clairvoyance. She follows that with a section on mediumship, then tarot cards- the tools of the psychic’s trade, to psychic phenomena to psychic defence and what do after you have all that training and knowledge, which most books never include. This book is invaluable. It covers everything you would need to know about being psychic and best of all, proves being psychic is not crazy but totally natural. 

The other books I encourage everyone to read are The Complete Guide to Psychic Development by Cassandra Eason and Raymond Buckland’s books about witchcraft and spirit communication. But I do just love Dugan’s book. Her style and tone are refreshingly different and  is so positive. 

I plan to reread Dugan’s books and the other books I mentioned. I hope this encourages you all to try the books and the exercises included within them. 

Enjoy the last of summer!

Blessings Spiderwitch

Autumn Tides

Merry meet all,

I just read the entire August issue of the Horror Writers Association newsletter. Wow it was a great read. I can’t wait to read some of the novels mentioned in the newsletter.  Paranormal Chronicles is launching its fall issue in September- in time for Halloween!! My article about the history of the Five Fishermen restaurant will be included in the next issue! More to look forward to. That and the Halloween stuff will soon be in stores. That makes me get out of bed!!! I will be back when I am broke.

I submitted an article to Paranormal Globe about my scary sleep paralysis experience. I hope they like the article and post it on their site. I am waiting to hear back from them. I haven’t had many supernatural experiences lately. That may change once October rolls around. I do plan to host a Samhain party and the theme this year is a séance.  I hope that goes well. It is still August but I hate leaving planning to the last minute. I also have the latest Witches and Pagans magazine to read and drool over every single printed word. I am sure it will be a great read, it always is. 

I just harvested rhubarb. I will prepare it later and store it in the freezer. I chop the rhubarb in bits on a cookie sheet with no rhubarb piece touching the other. Then I freeze it on the cookie sheet for one hour and then I store it in a plastic Ziploc bag in the freezer. The rhubarb chunks never stick together that way. 

Most of you are harvesting your goodies from the garden. Or, if you’re like me, you are anxiously waiting for your veggies and fruits to grow. I still sprinkle diatomaceous earth on the soil around my plants and I still fertilize my veggie plants too. I do that every second week or more if need be. Fertilizer gives plants a boost to grow better and be more productive. 

For all you horror movie aficionados, there is a hot lineup of movies sure to have you sleeping with the lights on!! First off is Scary Stories to tell in the Dar. The trailer freaks me out and I haven’t seen the rest of the movie yet. Whew. The next horror movie is Ready or not, and the bride must survive a harrowing night of a hazing ritual from her crazed husband’s family. Hold onto your crossbows! Next is Jacob’s ladder. I saw the trailer and put this one high on my must-see list. Oh yeah for sure. I have to see it. And I know you all are greatly anticipating the sequel to It: Chapter 2. We can’t leave Doctor Sleep, the awesome sequel to The Shining. I have read the novel twice and seen the movie. I can already taste the popcorn. I bet you all can too. Yup I am lining up to see that one too. That is the most anticipated horror movie fall lineup of 2019. I hope you all get a chance to enjoy the flicks. 

Blessings Spiderwitch

Links:

https://www.gamesradar.com/upcoming-horror-movies/?fbclid=IwAR12kG950RcmO7N9COVI9t_I1qQ2RU2nTwLta56cpEWQF4WYXbh51KTlAIo

 

 

 

Pumpkins Vine Time

Merry meet all,

The Halloween stuff is in the stores!! Oh my I’ll grab my broomstick and fly over and won’t be back till I’m broke!!! October is three months away. I’m still waiting for my veggies to grow though. I am anticipating a big harvest though. This is the time of year when I get excited. I live for Samhain. It’s time to dust off our brooms and our cauldrons, don our striped socks and head over to the stores selling the Halloween stuff.

My pumpkin vine has flowers!! My zucchini plant has a new flower too. I can’t wait for them to get big already. My cucumber plant has lots of flowers but tiny cucumbers. Oh my goddess it’s not like they have all year to grow. Can you tell I’m frustrated?

A real gardener is patient. I still can’t find that gardener. Since we are in harvest season, I hope you enjoy reading this post and learn how to grow your own!

Here are some tips on how to grow our favorite Halloween fruit-pumpkins. Pumpkins need up to 120 days to mature. Pumpkins can be grown from seed. However this year I had luck with the transplants I bought from the local plant store. Wait until all chances of frost have passed. They will grow in warm weather. They can take over a garden too and need up to 30 feet of room to grow.

Before planting your transplants, add plenty of compost material to the soil. You can grow the plants in hills. You mound up the soil and then (If you want to start from seed), put one seed per hill and plant up to four seeds in each hill Make sure there is plenty of room between the vines.

Pumpkins need tons of water. Be sure to only water the plants enough and to avoid root rot. If they look wilted, then the plant has died. Feed the plants a healthy mix of phosphorus and nitrogen, and add more phosphorus than nitrogen, which helps them grow their very best.

If you want to prune the vines, then be sure the vines have pumpkins on them first. When you carefully prune the plants, then you force the plant to stop concentrating on the vine growth and it focuses on maturing the fruit vine. This produces better fruit growth in the long run. Also, consider sprinkling diatomaceous earth under your plants. I did all summer and I have a healthy big zucchini plant in my garden that is pest bug free!

If insects are a problem on your vines, then plant nasturtiums. You have to attract pollinators to pollinate your plants. Aphids, cucumber beetles and stink bugs are a pest to your plants. By planting flowers such as nasturtiums, you will attract pollinators and the insects that might like some aphids for a tasty meal. Plant lots of flowers to increase your chances of healthy plants overall.

Harvesting pumpkins is fun and saves you money!! When the stem looks dry and the fruit is an orange color, it is time to harvest them! Knock hard on the rind of the pumpkin. It should sound hollow. Scrape your fingernail on the rind. It should not scratch easily. Harvest before the frost!

Use your favorite witch tool or boline to cut the pumpkin from the vine. Leave a few inches of stem to avoid disease. Let the pumpkins to cure for a couple of weeks first and store them properly. When they are fully cured, you will know. Allow for air ventilation and don’t dry them out near other fruit. Fruit give off ethylene gas. You can coat a pumpkin in oil which seals it for storage.

Enjoy your glowing orange pumpkins after all this hard work. !!

Blessings Spiderwitch

 

Lammas

Merry meet all,

The Wheel of the year has turned once again. Now we embrace Lughnasadh. The early harvest is upon us. Lammas is the first of the three harvest Sabbats. I want to see my garden grow. I still want my veggies to have  a chance before the frost.

I just bought a cool deck of playing cards- not tarot. The cards are from Alchemy Gothic and are so beautiful. There are two decks- one all white and the other is black. I shall enjoy those cards for a long time to come. The cards came in a lovely tin. The cards are decorated with skulls and dragons.

Mercury is finally out of retrograde. Normally Mercury retrograde never bothers me. This month I was hit with some serious ammo. I am so relieved it went direct. I had to quit Sacred Mists shy of earning my First Degree. I broke up with Vlad because he is such a jerk. I was in serious money trouble. It drove me to be sick at night with a hard rock stomach. Thankfully the difficult stuff is over and I can get on with my life. I am real upset but forward is the only way to go. We all have ups and downs in life. I think I have had more than my fair share.

The word Lammas is derived from the word loaf mass. More on this post in this link-

“The Festival Sabbat of Lammas

Lughnassadh, Lugnasad August 1st/2nd

It is now high summer and the union of Sun and Earth, of God and Goddess, has produced the First Harvest. Lammas is the celebration of this first, Grain Harvest, a time for gathering in and giving thanks for abundance. We work with the cycle that Mabon or the Autumn Equinox is the Second Harvest of Fruit, and Samhain is the third and Final Harvest of Nuts and Berries.

The word ‘Lammas’ is derived from ‘loaf mass’ and is indicative of how central and honoured is the first grain and the first loaf of the harvesting cycle.

Lugh

It is also the great festival of Lugh, or Lug, the great Celtic Sun King and God of Light. August is His sacred month when He initiated great festivities in honour of His mother, Tailtiu. Feasting, market fairs, games and bonfire celebrations were the order of the day. Circle dancing, reflecting the movement of the sun in sympathetic magic, was popular, as were all community gatherings. August was considered an auspicious month for handfastings and weddings.

But underlying this is the knowledge that the bounty and energy of Lugh, of the Sun, is now beginning to wane. It is a time of change and shift. Active growth is slowing down and the darker days of winter and reflection are beckoning…

The Grain Mother.

At Lammas the Goddess is in Her aspect as Grain Mother, Harvest Mother, Harvest Queen, Earth Mother, Ceres and Demeter. Demeter, as Corn Mother, represents the ripe corn of this year’s harvest and Her daughter Kore/Persephone represents the grain – the seed which drops back deep into the dark earth, hidden throughout the winter, and re-appears in the spring as new growth. This is the deep core meaning of Lammas and comes in different guises. The fullness and fulfillment of the present harvest already holds at its very heart the seed of all future harvest. (It is a fact that a pregnant woman carrying her as yet unborn daughter is also already carrying the ovary containing all the eggs her daughter will ever release – she is already both mother, grandmother and beyond, embodying the great Motherline – pure magic and mystery.)

So as the grain harvest is gathered in, there is food to feed the community through the winter and within that harvest is the seed of next year’s rebirth, regeneration and harvest. The Grain Mother is ripe and full, heavily pregnant she carries the seed of the new year’s Sun God within her. There is tension here. For the Sun God, the God of the Harvest, the Green Man, or John Barleycorn, surrenders his life with the cutting of the corn.

John Barleycorn

The Sun God, Lugh, as John Barleycorn, is the living Spirit of the corn, or grain. As the corn is cut so John Barleycorn is cut down also. He surrenders his life so that others may be sustained by the grain, so that the life of the community can continue. He is both eaten as the bread and is then reborn as the seed returns to the earth. The first sheaf of corn is supremely important, produces the first (and best) seed and assurance of future harvest. Death and rebirth. Everything dies in its season. Everything is reborn. This is our whisper of immortality. And the wonderful bittersweet of Lammas.

Customs of Cutting the Grain

There are many customs throughout Europe around the cutting of the grain or corn and they applied to all cereal crops including wheat, barley, rye and oats. Both the cutting of the first gain and the last grain are significant.

The first sheaf would often be ceremonially cut at dawn, winnowed, ground and baked into the Harvest Bread which was then shared by the community in thanks. The first barley stalks would be made into the first beer of the season. The first sheaf guarantees the seed and thus continuity.

The last sheaf was also ceremonially cut, often made into a ‘corn dolly’, carried to the village with festivity and was central to the Harvest Supper. The corn dolly was made into a Corn Maiden (after a good harvest) or a cailleach, hag or cone (after a bad harvest). She could be dressed with ribbons, even clothed.

This last sheaf would live in the home, often above the fireplace or hearth of the home, until the next harvest. Or it might be placed in the branches of a tree or mixed with the seed for the next year’s sowing. In some way it eventually needed to return to the earth from whence it came so that the fertilizing spirit of John Barleycorn, of the Harvest God, could pass from harvest to harvest. It could be ploughed back, returned to decay and rot, or burnt and the ashes scattered.

In some parts of Europe the tradition was to weave the last sheaf into a large Corn Mother with a smaller ‘baby’ inside it, representing the harvest to come the following year. Once the harvest was completed, safely gathered in, the festivities would begin. Bread was made from the new grain and thanks given to the Sun’s life-giving energy reborn as life-giving bread.

Herbs and Plants of Lammas

All Grains

wheat, barley, oats, rye, all representing both fulfillment and potential.

Meadowsweet.

Also known as Queen-Of-The-Meadow, Bridewort and Bride of the Meadow. One of the most sacred herbs of the Druids, this was often worn as a garland for Lammas celebrations and was a traditional herb for wedding circlets and bouquets at this time of year. Also used for love spells and can be strewn to promote peace, and its heady scent cheers the heart.

Mint.

Mint is another of the three most revered herbs of the Druids (vervain being the third, according to Grieve). Its magical properties are both protection and healing, and at this stage in the year, its properties of drawing abundance and prosperity, are most appropriate.

Sunflower. We take sunflowers for granted, they are perfectly named and loved by children of all ages. By this stage in the year the flower heads are full and heavy with that wonderful spiral of seeds and they spend the whole day gently turning their heads to gaze at the sun. In the Aztec temples of the sun, priestesses carried sunflowers and wore them as crowns. They symbolize the fertility of the Solar Logos.

Calendula. Little suns, pure joy, in all their shades from deep orange to pale yellow.

Colours of Lammas

Still green, with every shade of sun and harvest, from gold and yellow to deepest orange.

Lammas Altar

Wheat and all grains, corn dolly, bread, sunflowers and calendulas (pot marigolds).

Things To Do

Lammas Charm For Gathering In Abundance

You will need:

A broom or besom

. Don’t worry if it isn’t a traditional besom, any broom will do as it is always intent that is important. If you have no broom collect a bundle of twigs and tie them at the top with Lammas ribbon to make a hand broom shape. The besom/broom is a potent symbol of hearth and home, found in some form in almost every household. It is a traditional magical tool useful for everyday charms as it has the imprint of its owner firmly on it. Sweeping is a natural gathering gesture.

Ribbon.

A piece of green ribbon (for abundance), a piece of gold ribbon (for prosperity and gathering) or ribbon in Lammas harvest colours would be equally suitable.

A Spring of Mint.

Ideally a sprig of mint from your garden (but you can get this from any supermarket), or dried mint – put it in a pouch. The mint represents abundance and plenty and is easily accessible to the urban hedgewitch.

Take your broom and tie your ribbon around the stave or top. Tie in your sprig of mint or securely fasten your pouch. Take your broom outside, place both hands on the stave and focus on your intention – gathering in your harvest for winter. Turn slowly three times in a clockwise direction then start to sweep towards your door saying:


“By one, two, three and four, sweep Lammas gifts to my door. May abundance be a constant friend, by my hearth till Winter’s end.”

Repeat this three times, then take your besom/broom back into your house and put it in its usual place. You can leave the ribbon on for as long as want to, for a lunar month, or until winter is done. If you have made your own broom you can place it where you consider the heart of your home to be. The mint can be returned to the earth with thanks.

If you do not have an outside space you can sweep from your front door inwards to either your kitchen or hearth using the same charm.

Charm donated with generous heart by the Counter Enchantress.

Make A Grain Mother

Make your own Grain Mother or Corn Dolly. Go for a walk and see what you can find – stalks of wheat, oats, barley, rye often left growing on the edges of fields after harvesting, failing that any grasses and/or reeds you can find. Let your creativity out – if you feel confident, weave your Grain Mother into being, but equally you can just lace and tie her into being with Lammas coloured ribbons. As you do so, give thanks for the gifts of Harvest. Place your Grain Mother on your altar or at the centre of celebrations. At Samhain, return the grain stalks to the earth, they contain the seeds of future harvest…

Bake Bread

Buttermilk Bread Charm for Lammas

You will need:

3 mugs of strong white flour

500 ml of Buttermilk (available from the supermarket)

I teaspoonful of bicarbonate of soda

Lammas ribbon in your choice of colour – gold, orange, yellow

Sprouted seeds – these represent regeneration. Can even be bought in the supermarket now. Frequently found in wholefood shops – or sprout your own.

Place the flour in a large bowl. Make a well in the centre. Sieve in the blended salt and soda and pour in the buttermilk. Mix well with a wooden spoon until the dough feels springy and then mix in the sprouted seeds. If it feels too sloppy just add a little more flour. Turn it onto a board and cover with a fine dusting of flour. Pat it with your hands until you have a round shape. Take a sharp knife and score lightly into eight sections, one for each festival. Our picture shows the bread cut into five sections, making a pentacle.

Place onto a greased baking tray and pop your buttermilk bread into a moderate oven for about 20-25 minutes. Keep and eye on it. When the bread is ready it will change colour and it will sound hollow when you tap the bottom. Cool completely on a wire rack. When it is cool, tie it with Lammas ribbon.

Take time to concentrate on the bread you have created and turn the loaf three times saying“From the fields and through the stones, into fire, Lammas Bread, as the Wheel turns may all be fed. Goddess Bless.”

Now take your bread and share it with your family and friends and pass on the generous blessings of this bright and bountiful festival. Eat it fresh, as soon as it is made if you can.

Recipe donated by the Counter Enchantress. Adapted by the Boss Lady with permission.

Collect The Seeds Of Future Harvest

Involve children if you can. Collect and dry them in the sun, ready for next year’s planting. Consider giving them as gifts at Samhain or Yule. Seeds are such amazing and mysterious things – each tiny seed contains within it the blueprint for the whole plant it will become. It will mirror its mother plant, the mother that raised the seed and returned it to the earth with the help of the light of the sun. It’s a miracle every time.

Above all:
Have Fun, Give Thanks and Celebrate.

All information offered is checked to the best of our ability, and whilst every effort has been made to make it accurate, no responsibility will be accepted for errors and omissions.


Any information displayed on our web site(s) or other printed matter from the shop is not regarded to be authoritative or certified as the best practice and is only considered to be useful supplementary advice to other certified codes of practice. All information on our web site is updated regularly.”

I give credit to the authors of the site.

Blessings Spiderwitch

“Halifax: Five Fishermen restaurant”

everythingparanormal

Here’s a story from another blog. It’s from my home province of Nova Scotia and the capital of Halifax here are just some of the stories there. You can read the rest of them at,
http://secondsightparanormal.blogspot.com/2009/09/haunted-nova-scotia.html
Halifax: Five Fisherman Restaurant

The building goes back to the 1800’s and was home to a few schools and one mortuary. The mortuary helped lay to rest several victims of the great Titanic disaster as well as helped deal with the numerous victims from the Great Halifax Explosion that claimed 2000 lives.

Ghost stories are shared on the restaurants webpage and include the following eerie notes.
“Many of the staff of the Five Fishermen Restaurant are so used to odd occurrences that they wouldn’t even bat an eye when a glass flies off a shelf with no one near, or when cutlery on a table shifts then falls to the floor by itself. There…

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In Memory of Rosemary Ellen Guiley

Merry meet all,

I was saddened to hear that Rosemary Ellen Guiley had passed. She was an amazing person with many books to her credit.  I own some of her books such as The Encyclopedia of Ghosts and Spirits and The Encyclopedia of Witches, Witchcraft and Wicca. I love them both and plan to read these splendid books cover to cover. 

This is what the throngs of people who loved Rosemary Ellen Guiley had to say about her: “We are saddened to learn of the passing of our friend Rosemary Ellen Guiley (July 8, 1950-July 18, 2019) who was an American writer on topics related to spirituality, the occult, and the paranormal. She is also a radio show host, a certified hypnotist, a board director of the “National Museum of Mysteries and Research” and the “Foundation for Research into Extraterrestrial Encounters”, and a “Lifetime Achievement Award” winner from the Upper Peninsula Paranormal Research Society, Michigan. She has written more than 49 books, including ten encyclopedias, the newest of which called “Planet Bigfoot” she sent to us just a few weeks ago which is several sasquatch related stories that have been published with Fate Magazine. ” 

(Facebook.com)

Well I shall enjoy the legacy she left behind and enjoy reading her books proudly displayed on my bookshelf. I am not done purchasing half her books. I plan to get more books by her. I hope those who loved her and knew her well are comforted by the fact that she did leave a great legacy behind. She has inspired me to be sure. 

In other news, I printed out the Horror Writers Association Poetry Showcase Volume 5. I hole punched the pages, stored them in a binder and decorated the binder a little. I shall enjoy reading the poems and hope to learn from the writers how they wrote their own poems in my binder. 

Let’s all remember Rosemary Ellen Guiley in our thoughts. 

Blessings Spiderwitch